The Earthkeepers Podcast promotes global connection among ecological-minded people who believe that earth care is an integral part of spiritual life. Through conversations about topics like ecology, climate change, gardening, farming, social enterprise, theology, environmental justice, outdoor recreation, conservation and community development, we aim to inspire a movement of ordinary earthkeepers who will help heal the world.

Screen Shot 2020-04-21 at 12.46.05 PM.pn
Screen Shot 2020-04-21 at 12.51.55 PM.pn
Screen Shot 2020-04-21 at 1.15.34 PM.png
Screen Shot 2020-04-21 at 1.12.19 PM.png
Sign up here for podcast announcements
and general updates from Circlewood.
Your gift will fund new episodes, help us reach new people,
and give you access to bonus content!
EPISODES
EPISODE 12
DISMANTLING ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTIONS: A GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE SPEAKS OUT

This episode features an employee of a federal land management agency who has much to say about the current administration's systematic dismantling of programs and laws that have been developed over the years to preserve and restore the health of the environment. According to the Brookings Institute, in this last summer alone the current administration has loosened restrictions on methane emissions from oil wells, undermined the process of determining energy efficiency requirements for appliances, moved to open Alaska's Arctic Wildlife Refuge to oil exploration, and weakened core elements of the Endangered Species Act. On the condition on anonymity, our guest has agreed to share an insider's view of the relentless attacks being mounted on this matrix of protections that have taken generations to put into place.

EPISODE 11
ENVIRONMENTAL ADVOCACY WHEN OTHERS DON'T BELIEVE: RACHEL JONES AND JASON LYLE ON LIFE IN THE AMERICAN SOUTH

In this episode we’ll be talking to Rachel Jones, who teaches at a college in Tennessee, and Jason Lyle, who leads an international nonprofit and serves in a church in Georgia. Both live in places where there is cultural ambivalence about the importance of earthkeeping, and for some, even outright denial of climate change realities. Rachel and Jason though have each found creative ways to express their love of creation, and to speak out of their passion for environmental justice in ways that don’t shut down the conversation.

EPISODE 10
THE JOURNEY THUS FAR: FORREST INSLEE AND JAMES AMADON ON THE FUTURE OF EARTHKEEPERS

In this episode, Forrest and James Amadon review the episodes that we’ve created in the first six months of the Earthkeepers podcast. We identify some of the themes that have emerged, consider some of the personal lessons we’ve learned, and dream a bit about where the podcast is headed in the future! 

EPISODE 9
A VISION FOR GLOBAL COMMUNITY: RANDY BORMAN AND THE COFÁN FOREST GUARDIANS

In this episode we talk with Randy Borman, a respected leader among the Cofán indigenous people of Ecuador. Randy was born at the headwaters of the Amazon; he grew up among the Cofán people, speaking their language and living life in the forest as any young Cofán does. He also learned American culture from his missionary parents, and later pursued a Western university education before returning to his home and his people in Ecuador. Today, Randy is a respected leader among the Cofán, and is also well-known internationally among global environmental advocates. In our conversation we talk about indigenous worldviews, the unseen world, protecting the rain forest as a defense against climate change, and the need for a global cooperative approach to earthkeeping.

EPISODE 8
ENCOUNTERING GOD IN NATURE: VICTORIA LOORZ AND WILD CHURCHES

Forrest Inslee and  James Amadon talk with Victoria Loorz, founder of the Wild Church Network, a broad association of religious communities that practice faith life in ways that foster connectedness to all of creation. A key practice of a wild church is holding some or all of their community gatherings in the outdoors, encouraging and guiding people to sense God’s presence in the natural world. You might recall from episode 6 that an essential indigenous value is seeking to be a “good relative” among all the myriad beings that make up the family of creation. In a similar way, Wild Churches seek to cultivate this dynamic of relationship that they call “KIN-dom”.

EPISODE 7
RECONCILING - TO THE LAND AND ONE ANOTHER - CHRISTI RENAUD AND PLANT WITH PURPOSE

In this episode we talk with Christi Renaud, Director of Marketing and Development for Plant with Purpose, which works with impoverished communities around the world  to build strong local economies by encouraging good agriculture and financial management practices. Plant with Purpose is set apart from many other international development agencies through their emphasis on ecology and environmental health.  Join us as we discuss the importance of local knowledge in community development, the connections between environmental justice and social justice, and creation care’s rootedness in yearning for God.

EPISODE 6
IN KINSHIP WITH CREATION: AN INDIGENOUS WORLDVIEW, WITH LENORE THREE STARS

Lenore Three Stars is a member of the board for Circlewood—the larger creation care community to which Earthkeepers belongs. As a member of the Lakota people, Lenore helps us to understand and embrace elements of an indigenous world view. In this episode we discuss a kinship model of creation care, as a corrective to a Western worldview that views people as separate from, and dominant over, creation.

EPISODE 5
WHERE SPIRITUALITY AND SCIENCE MEET

In this episode we talk to Leah Kostamo about her work at the Brooksdale Environmental Center in Surrey, British Colombia, and how she helps people understand the spirituality, as well as the science, of creation care. We also touch on themes of hospitality, children and nature, spiritual practices, our "ecological footprint," and environmental science. 

EPISODE 4
URBAN FARMING AND ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE

In this episode we talk to Matt Ryan, an urban farmer in Chicago whose makes it his mission to educate the community about the social and environmental justice dynamics of growing food. The conversation includes crucial topics such as the intimacy of a farmer’s relationship to the land; the sustainability of small-scale farming; urban and backyard farming; the global food supply chain; and winter gardening. 

EPISODE 3
GARDENS, COMMUNITY, AND GOD-PRESENCE

In this episode, contemplative author and gardener Christine Aroney-Sine offers a perspective from the Global South, in particular from her native Australia. She shares her thoughts about the connection between gardening and community, and explains lectio tierra--the practice of sensing the presence of God in nature. We speak as well about the ways in which all of these things found expression in ancient Celtic traditions--an historical European indigenous worldview that is finding new relevance today among people who care about community development and creation care.

EPISODE 2
SOCIAL JUSTICE IN AN URBAN COMMUNITY GARDEN

In this episode Tahmina Martelly of World Relief explains the connections between social and environmental justice, and how they play out in her work with immigrants and refugees. The community garden that they have built together has become a center for multicultural community, where people celebrate ethnic, cultural, economic, and religious diversity. Tahmina also addresses resistance among some Christians to matters of global warming and climate change, and challenges us to think about the sort of grace it takes to model a different approach to creation care. 

EPISODE 1
EARTH CARE AND SPIRITUALITY

In this episode Forrest Inslee, Earthkeepers Podcast host, and James Amadon, Executive Director of Circlewood, talk about what the podcast is about, and what to expect in future episodes. Both tell their stories of how they sense and understand God in nature, and how creation care eventually became a core element of their respective callings. They speak of the need for community among people who believe that earth care is connected to spiritual practice. Only by finding support in one and other, and by learning in global community from a diversity of perspectives, can ecologically-minded people begin to shape a movement--a movement to combat climate change, to mobilize for environmental restoration, to advocate for environmental justice, and to restore right relationship between people and the rest of creation of which they are a part.

ABOUT US

The mission of Circlewood is to accelerate the transition of humanity into life-giving inhabitants of creation.

CONTACT

206.319.5224

 

Circlewood

2007 179th Ct NE

Redmond, WA 98052

 

info@circlewood.online

SIGN UP FOR CIRCLEWOOD UPDATES

© 2018 by CIRCLEWOOD